milthanks:

i have watched this at least 300 times and have laughed every single time

ceecee-natsume:

That’s right, the official site for The Lost Valley is now officially open!  We rarely do these full sites — only for very special games — and we’re super excited about this one :D

rinkara:

sodakick:

glux2:

The first one always gets me for all the little details, specially how Link seemingly tried to murder Ganondorf in his sleep.

Reblogging for grumpy dad Ganondorf.

these are by ガブ吉

nehirose:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

i’ve reblogged this before but this one has further breakdown of exactly why, and i love it. (also hell yes, kudos to the costume department for this; it’s wrong, but it’s so clearly DELIBERATELY wrong considering how well they nailed it during the 40s sequences).

sourcedumal:

rhpolitics:

dynastylnoire:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

tashabilities:

jcoleknowsbest:

postracialcomments:

wiwaxiasunglasses:

postracialcomments:

postracialcomments:

In response to the shooting death of Mary Spears in Detroit.

I cant make this shit up. Men……..I swear they just don’t understand the fear of being a woman

hek23 “Ok I’m confused, women do you want a thug or not?”

HAHN?!!?!

It seems like a hideously shitty idea to give your number to someone who’d physically attack you for not giving it.

"Oh, a person that dangerous and unstable definitely won’t use my number to call me or find out where I live or stalk me or anything!"

Not sure if dude here is really dumb, talking about fake numbers, or just using potential violence as an excuse to try and convince people to give him numbers.

What they usually ignore is that giving fake numbers will put you at risk as well

Men have gotten smarter by calling that number right in front of you to make sure that is your number

Smh…

That calling the number right in front of me shit happened to me a couple times.

Thankfully, none of those dudes EVER called me again, but the fact that they would call the number with me standing there would fill me with dread and tell me immediately what kind of person he is.

Like, nigga, IF it’s a fake number, WHAT you gon DO to me?

I think they were just asking for my number for sport, cause they never actually called me again,

But I shudder to think about how many times this could have been me,

How it angers me that I have to ‘have a boyfriend’ because dudes will respect another man before they’ll respect ME and my right to not want they ass.

Actually Tashabilities… she told him that she had a boyfriend. And Thats when he killed her. 

THE ACTUAL HELL MAN?! I can’t.

Every possible scenario when a man tries to kill a woman over her phone number, people will find a way to blame her for what he did:

  • You ignore him, so he attacks you. “Why couldn’t you just be polite? Why would you provoke someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You try to politely turn him down, so he attacks you. “Why couldn’t you just pretend to be interested? Why would you provoke someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You fake interest because you’re scared he’s going to hurt you. He thinks you’re serious and won’t leave you alone and then he attacks you when you finally try to shake him off politely with a totally reasonable excuse. “Why’d you lead him on? Why would you encourage someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You give him your phone number to get him to leave you alone. He starts calling you a lot, but you don’t answer, so he tracks you down, and then he attacks you. “Why did you give him your phone number? Why would you encourage someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You give him your fake phone number to get him to leave you alone. He realizes it’s not your real number, so he attacks you. “Why would you give him a fake phone number? Why would you provoke someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You give him your real phone number and you try to be nice when you call. Eventually he realizes you’re not actually interested and attacks you. “Why did you lead him on? Why would you encourage someone who was obviously violent?”
  • You give him your real phone number and end up being harassed into a relationship with someone who is obviously violent because you are scared for your life. He eventually tries to kill you anyhow for nebulous reasons that ultimately boil down to: he can’t completely control you the way he wants to because you are a person, not a doll. “Why do women date violent men? I don’t understand why they don’t just leave.”

I’ve heard all of these arguments in all of these situations. Men use harassment, coercion, and violence to try to get what they believe they are entitled to from women, and the woman gets blamed no matter what. Men are never expected to take responsibility for their bad behavior, because their sense of entitlement is never questioned by our misogynistic patriarchal society. In our warped society, it is reasonable for men to expect that women should be compliant, should be willing to give any man who wants them exclusive rights to her body, sex, affection, and love, and so it is reasonable for men to become violent when a woman acts in any way that denies men control over her person.

Therefore, when a man gets violent, the problem is not the man and his sense of entitlement, it is the woman, who didn’t do “what she was supposed to” even if there is absolutely nothing she could do, short of giving up her autonomy and personhood entirely. And men who get violent when women refuse to comply do so to remind them: if you won’t surrender your personhood willingly, we will take it from you by force.

This is about control, not a phone number.

Why all men are responsible for stopping this. ALL MEN

ectcbiologist:

so, uh.

bakedloaf:

nickijuana:

khaleesi:

this-tea-tastes-like-sleep:

Omg where have you been all my god damn worthless life

these angels of light brought me a brownie topped with cookie dough at midnight once

Hah, don’t I need this 

this is being brought to our town

Philadelphia. *Thumbs up* 

The idea of fan cultures, or “fandoms,” cultivating fan fiction writers began at the earliest in the 1920s with societies dedicated to Jane Austen and Sherlock Holmes, but took off in the late 1960s with the advent of Star Trek fanzines. The negative stereotype of fans today is that of obsessed geeks, like Trekkies, who love nothing more than to watch the same installments over and over… However, this represents a core misunderstanding of what it is to be a fan: that is, to have the “ability to transform personal reaction into social interaction, spectatorial culture into participatory culture… not by being a regular viewer of a particular program but by translating that viewing into some kind of cultural activity.” Henry Jenkins, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and expert on fan culture, likens fan fiction to the story of The Velveteen Rabbit: that the investment in something is what gives it a meaning rather than any intrinsic merits or economic value. For fans who invest in a television show, book, or movie, that investment sparks production, and reading or viewing sparks writing, until the two are inseparable. They are not watching the same thing over and over, but rather are creating something new instead.

That one scene in ‘The Bitch of Living’

the-thought-emporium-imperial:

ledians:

kotakucom:

In November, Beams will start selling life-sized Pikachu plushies in Japan. Like real Pikachu, they’re 0.4 meters tall and weigh 6 kilograms (about 13 pounds). And yes, they come with a tote bag, for whatever reason.

friendfriend

Chubby-chu!

vibrates with need